Garlic Aversion
fleurdulys:

Forever Lost - Mike Worrall
2007

fleurdulys:

Forever Lost - Mike Worrall

2007

4nimalparty:

Skógafoss, Iceland (by pas le matin)

4nimalparty:

Skógafoss, Iceland (by pas le matin)

fleurdulys:

Konigsee, Bavaria - Frederic Edwin Church
1868

fleurdulys:

Konigsee, Bavaria - Frederic Edwin Church

1868

onereedyear:

The Stroll - Gertrude Abercrombie

onereedyear:

The Stroll - Gertrude Abercrombie

rjtyler:

MELÉNDEZ, Luis

Spanish painter (b. 1716, Napoli, d. 1780, Madrid)

Still-Life of Fruit
1773
Oil on canvas, 38 x 50 cm

Private collection

In 1771 the artist received a commission from the young Prince of Asturias, the future Charles IV, to paint a series of still-lifes to decorate his cabinet of natural history, a private museum in his quarters in the Royal Palace. He executed a series of forty four still-lifes (now in various museums).
The present work represents a still-life of apricots in a ceramic bowl, with branches of apricots and their foliage protruding outwards, together with cherries and a single branch of apricots, all arranged upon a plain table top. It was almost certainly painted the year after the artist’s completion of the majority of the series of still-lifes for the Prince of Asturias, in 1773.

rjtyler:

MELÉNDEZ, Luis

Spanish painter (b. 1716, Napoli, d. 1780, Madrid)

Still-Life of Fruit

1773

Oil on canvas, 38 x 50 cm

Private collection

In 1771 the artist received a commission from the young Prince of Asturias, the future Charles IV, to paint a series of still-lifes to decorate his cabinet of natural history, a private museum in his quarters in the Royal Palace. He executed a series of forty four still-lifes (now in various museums).

The present work represents a still-life of apricots in a ceramic bowl, with branches of apricots and their foliage protruding outwards, together with cherries and a single branch of apricots, all arranged upon a plain table top. It was almost certainly painted the year after the artist’s completion of the majority of the series of still-lifes for the Prince of Asturias, in 1773.

rjtyler:

MELÉNDEZ, Luis

Spanish painter (b. 1716, Napoli, d. 1780, Madrid)

Still-Life
1770
Oil on canvas, 49 x 37 cm

Museo del Prado, Madrid

The picture represents a still-life of a box of sweets, pastry and other objects.

rjtyler:

MELÉNDEZ, Luis

Spanish painter (b. 1716, Napoli, d. 1780, Madrid)

Still-Life

1770

Oil on canvas, 49 x 37 cm

Museo del Prado, Madrid

The picture represents a still-life of a box of sweets, pastry and other objects.

animus-inviolabilis:

Catedral vegetal
Remedios Varo
Gouache on paper
1957

animus-inviolabilis:

Catedral vegetal

Remedios Varo

Gouache on paper

1957

rjtyler:

MELÉNDEZ, Luis

Spanish painter (b. 1716, Napoli, d. 1780, Madrid)

Still-Life with Figs
1760s
Oil on canvas, 37 x 49 cm

Musée du Louvre, Paris

In 1753, after four years in the Eternal City, Meléndez was recalled by his father to assist with a prestigious commission from Ferdinand VI to illuminate a new set of choir books for the Royal Chapel, to replace those lost in the fire of the Alcázar in 1734. Despite the high acclaim which his illuminations (which show early signs of his skilful depiction of inanimate objects) received at court, Luis’ subsequent four petitions to be appointed royal painter were declined by Charles III. It seems likely that Meléndez’s archaic miniaturist style and lack of experience beyond that specialised work counted against him, at a time when the royal court required artists adept in producing large-scale works in fresco and canvas (such as Corrado Giaquinto) to decorate the new Palacio Real, as well as proven portrait painters to promote the recent accesion of Charles III in 1759. On completion of his royal illuminations it appears that Meléndez received no further commissions at court and as a result the artist began to turn in desperation to the subject which ironically would earn him enduring international fame - still-life painting.
It is no co-incidence therefore that the artist’s earliest known still-lifes date from around 1759-60. Despite the important tradition of still-life painting during the Spanish Golden Age, the genre had dramatically declined by the second half of the 18th century, with none of the court painters being regular practicioners of the art. For Meléndez, still-lifes were a relatively easy commodity to sell, and would typically have been painted on speculation of finding a buyer (rather than on commission). It seems that during the 1760s and 1770s he largely cornered the market in Madrid, being the only significant still-life painter working there at that time.

rjtyler:

MELÉNDEZ, Luis

Spanish painter (b. 1716, Napoli, d. 1780, Madrid)

Still-Life with Figs

1760s

Oil on canvas, 37 x 49 cm

Musée du Louvre, Paris

In 1753, after four years in the Eternal City, Meléndez was recalled by his father to assist with a prestigious commission from Ferdinand VI to illuminate a new set of choir books for the Royal Chapel, to replace those lost in the fire of the Alcázar in 1734. Despite the high acclaim which his illuminations (which show early signs of his skilful depiction of inanimate objects) received at court, Luis’ subsequent four petitions to be appointed royal painter were declined by Charles III. It seems likely that Meléndez’s archaic miniaturist style and lack of experience beyond that specialised work counted against him, at a time when the royal court required artists adept in producing large-scale works in fresco and canvas (such as Corrado Giaquinto) to decorate the new Palacio Real, as well as proven portrait painters to promote the recent accesion of Charles III in 1759. On completion of his royal illuminations it appears that Meléndez received no further commissions at court and as a result the artist began to turn in desperation to the subject which ironically would earn him enduring international fame - still-life painting.

It is no co-incidence therefore that the artist’s earliest known still-lifes date from around 1759-60. Despite the important tradition of still-life painting during the Spanish Golden Age, the genre had dramatically declined by the second half of the 18th century, with none of the court painters being regular practicioners of the art. For Meléndez, still-lifes were a relatively easy commodity to sell, and would typically have been painted on speculation of finding a buyer (rather than on commission). It seems that during the 1760s and 1770s he largely cornered the market in Madrid, being the only significant still-life painter working there at that time.

fleurdulys:

The Plain at Auvers - Vincent van Gogh
1890

fleurdulys:

The Plain at Auvers - Vincent van Gogh
1890

wapiti3:

The orchids, iconographic history organography, classification, geography, collections, trade, employment, culture, with a descriptive review of the species cultivated in Europe on Flickr.

By Puydt, Emile de, 1810-1891,
Publication info Paris,J. Rothschild,1880.
BHL Collections:
Harvard University Herbarium, Botany Libraries